Lukasz Wierzbowski – 20 Something Analog

20 Something Analog

Lukasz Wierzbowski was born in Poland in 1983. He pretty much has dedicated himself to film photography since about 2010. So, in essence, he became a 20 something analog photographer early on. Something the pundits want us to believe to be as rare as an Elvis sighting. Well, the pundits are wrong. It’s not even a matter of bravery in a high tech world. It’s a matter of artistic resolve, authenticity and a true artistic journey. Like fellow Pole, Ilona Szwarc, they have almost started a new “Polish Aesthetic” movement.

 

Lukasz Wierzbowski
© Lukasz Wierzbowski

 

Canonet
© Lukasz Wierzbowski

 

Be Weird, Use Film

While he does seem to like the play of natural light sources, it’s his photo journalistic flash style that most often jumps out at you. A style people love or hate. Why, I don’t know. Different styles are certainly valid, as is this one. Either way, he exhibits a cross between a Les Krims crazy world and a in your face paparazzi style. He employs mostly a Canon Rebel K2, Canon Elan II, Olympus MJU II and Canonet 28 cameras these days.

 

Lukasz Wierzbowski
© Lukasz Wierzbowski

 

Olympus MJU
© Lukasz Wierzbowski

 

Lukasz Wierzbowski – Great Art is Blind

OK, he is Polish and based in Wroclaw, a small town in south Poland. He continues to provide unique and creative images from someplace other than New York or Paris. While the photographic elite look down on anyone out of the geographic cities of artistic importance, he continues to churn out original work with no access to stylists and super models.

 

Canonet
© Lukasz Wierzbowski

 

Olympus MJU
© Lukasz Wierzbowski

 

His project “5 things I love about Film”, showed both his great use of color and stark originality while the art directors of the world continue to scratch their heads.

 

Canonet
© Lukasz Wierzbowski

 

Olympus MJU
© Lukasz Wierzbowski

 

Wierzbowski is a young film photographer to watch. Let the Creative Directors of the world, (is that an oxymoron?), keep scratching.

There is a new movement that are dedicating themselves to film, whether the camera companies and their windfall profits like it or not. It’s not just the “old timers” that are returning. It’s a new generation of “artists” dedicated to the process. That said, I think that Wedding and baby photographers should stay the digital course. There would be no competitive advantage. But, there is a place for all.

 

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